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jane nalunga

Reflecting on Uganda’s fiscal space for health

Myria Koutsoumpa

This past summer, as an intern at Wemos and as part of my thesis for the Global Health master’s programme at Maastricht University, I took up the opportunity to interview Jane Nalunga, Country Director of SEATINI-Uganda, about the country’s economic and human resources for health  (HRH) situation. She has over 20 years of experience in policy research, analysis and advocacy on trade, tax and investment, and shares Wemos’ view of health as a public good.

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new york

Why investing in health is a challenge under the current global economic system

Linda Mans

This summer I took up IHP’s suggestion and read Paul Mason’s ‘PostCapitalism: a Guide to Our Future’. That triggered my interest in Ilias Alami’s ‘On the terrorism of money and national policy-making in emerging capitalist economies’. My “summer of Marxism” provided me with a few clues on why investing in health and the health workforce is a ‘Grand Challenge’ of sorts (to borrow a term from an arch-capitalist). That shouldn’t stop us from advocating for it, though, even if the term is still an understatement, I’m afraid.

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wha wemos 2018

The future of global health, then and now

Linda Mans

Last week, the 71st edition of the World Health Assembly and pre-meetings of civil society discussed topics of this very moment such as health and environment, or the root causes of health inequity. At the same time, the Alma-Ata declaration from forty years ago showed its renewed actuality. That made the Assembly my trip back to the future.

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24/7

Elisa Veini

Imagine working at a health clinic for a week on the run. Imagine finding out that your only colleague has left and will not be replaced. Imagine, then, having to rely on your mobile telephone for light while attending a mother giving birth. Does this sound extreme? It is. It is also the reality of health workers in Malawi.

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wemos malawi health system

Baby Teddy

Elisa Veini

Sometimes evidence is simply there without you knowing. I had come to Malawi to talk with people about the shortcomings of the country’s health system. No longer than half an hour after landing at Lilongwe airport, the first case presented itself to me.

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