Blog

ARE UHC KIDDING ME? 5 ALTERNATIVES TO EQUITABLY FUND HEALTH FOR ALL

Renée de Jong

While Universal Health Coverage (UHC) as initiated by the World Health Organization is a promising concept, I remain critical about the current ambitions in the declaration of the High-Level Meeting on UHC at the United Nations Headquarters in September. The vision is there, but what intrigues me, is what remains unsaid. In this era where global inequalities are bigger than ever[1], I believe it is time to do some thinking outside of the box on how we will fund our healthcare.

Continue reading

Our key takeaways from the 72nd World Health Assembly

Winne van Woerden

Last month in Geneva, from 22-28 May, the 72th World Health Assembly (WHA) took place, an annually returning event where World Health Organization (WHO) delegates convene to discuss health-related issues. Several global health advocates travelled to Switzerland to represent Wemos at the WHA and present some of our work to other delegates. Two of them – Lisa Seidelmann and Amanda Banda – look back on their visit and their key takeaways.

Continue reading

Wemos Dr Lisa Seidelmann GFF Spring Meetings 2019 Civil Society Policy Forum

After the replenishment: How is the Global Financing Facility addressing civil society’s concerns?

Myria Koutsoumpa & Lisa Seidelmann

Is the Global Financing Facility (GFF) addressing civil society’s critical concerns after the replenishment in November? Wemos sought an answer to this question at our fruitful session in April at the Civil Society Policy Forum, at the 2019 Spring Meetings of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington D.C.

Continue reading

Wilbert Bannenberg Wemos

19 March 1979 – the start of Wemos

Wilbert Bannenberg

In early March 1979, I – Wilbert Bannenberg, an intern doctor at the time – put a notice on the bulletin board of the Faculty of Medicine at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. I was looking for other students with whom to discuss working as a doctor in low- and middle-income countries. On 19 March 1979, around 20 people gathered in my student room on the second floor of Van Woustraat 47.

Continue reading

My week with Ann

Corinne  Hinlopen

‘Are you angry enough to make these maternal mortality rates drop to 70 by 2030?!’ Two piercing dark eyes are looking sternly over a pair of glasses at a group of students. They belong to Dr. Ann Phoya, President of the Association of Malawian Midwives (AMAMI). She is trying to instill a sense of urgency into a group of students at the Royal Tropical Institute in Amsterdam. Her powerful call to action hits home, there is awed silence in the room.

Continue reading

Health is a human right: who is accountable for its realization?

Myria Koutsoumpa

In the era of capitalism, the health of people and the planet is fundamentally challenged. International trade agreements and global economic policies have a great influence on national policies. They can even restrict countries in their ability to structurally improve and strengthen their health care systems. This makes health a shared responsibility at both national and global level, in which equity between and within countries should be a key element. To strengthen this perspective we need to reaffirm health as a human right and put it back in the limelight as such.

Continue reading

Reflecting on Uganda’s fiscal space for health

Myria Koutsoumpa

This past summer, as an intern at Wemos and as part of my thesis for the Global Health master’s programme at Maastricht University, I took up the opportunity to interview Jane Nalunga, Country Director of SEATINI-Uganda, about the country’s economic and human resources for health  (HRH) situation. She has over 20 years of experience in policy research, analysis and advocacy on trade, tax and investment, and shares Wemos’ view of health as a public good.

Continue reading

new york

Why investing in health is a challenge under the current global economic system

Linda Mans

This summer I took up IHP’s suggestion and read Paul Mason’s ‘PostCapitalism: a Guide to Our Future’. That triggered my interest in Ilias Alami’s ‘On the terrorism of money and national policy-making in emerging capitalist economies’. My “summer of Marxism” provided me with a few clues on why investing in health and the health workforce is a ‘Grand Challenge’ of sorts (to borrow a term from an arch-capitalist). That shouldn’t stop us from advocating for it, though, even if the term is still an understatement, I’m afraid.

Continue reading