Countries push EU Commission for initiatives on chemicals and circular economy

In a letter to the European Commission, ten EU Member States have raised their concerns about current delays in delivering commitments to manage chemicals – including the non-toxic environment strategy and the EDC strategy. Wemos applauds this.

Ministers from Finland, France, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovakia and Sweden have expressed their concerns. Dutch Deputy Minister Stientje van Veldhoven, together with her colleagues, demands the European Commission to continue working on four key pieces of legislation related to chemicals and the circular economy until the end of its current mandate.

 

Non-toxic environment

The letter fits perfectly well with Wemos’ message to deliver a non-toxic environment and an endocrine disruptor strategy. In a copy of the letter obtained by POLITICO’s Kait Bolongaro, environment officials stress they  are worried about possible delays to the files — and the Commission giving in to the temptation of leaving it up to the next college to make potentially controversial proposals.

 

Global health advocate Linda Mans: ‘Together with the Health and Environment Alliance , Wemos has been calling upon the European Commission to come up with concrete and coherent measures to reduce citizens’ daily intake of endocrine disruptors. I’m pleased to see the support of these ten Member States. It shows the urgency for action at European level: now.’

 

Read more about our work on harmful substances

 

Recent News items

The Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation policy document does not sufficiently address access to healthcare for poorer people

14-07-2022

The new policy paper of Minister Schreinemacher of Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation, “Doen waar Nederland goed in is (“Doing what the Netherlands is good at”), is very much focused on Dutch business interests and seems to have insufficient attention for realising access to health care for poorer population groups. The Minister indicates that she wants to invest more in public-private collaborations in low- and middle-income countries, also in healthcare. As a result, there is a great risk that healthcare will become more commercial and therefore unaffordable for people with fewer financial resources. To provide good healthcare, the Minister should, instead, contribute to strengthening the capacity and financial resources in the public sector. 

Continue reading

What are best practices to address brain drain of health workers?

07-07-2022

What are best (regional) practices when it comes to addressing brain drain – i.e. the emigration of skilled workers, including health workers – and what action is needed on EU level? With this open consultation, the European Commission is interested in feedback on the scale and dynamics of brain drain, and in successful practices and regional strategies and policies to tackle the emigration of qualified workers. Wemos has provided input to the consultation. We recommend, for example, that EU Member States use existing instruments to implement policies and strategies based on evidence, to strengthen their health workforce.

Continue reading