Tag: GFF

Webinar & report April 19: how do the Global Fund, GFF and Gavi coordinate their efforts to strengthen health systems?

During a joint interactive webinar on April 19th, Wemos and Cordaid – as part of the Dutch Global Health Alliance – will share our joint report’s main findings and recommendations on health systems strengthening coordination among the ‘3Gs’. The 3Gs are the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations (Gavi) and the Global Financing Facility (GFF). They are the three largest global health initiatives that raise and allocate funds to strengthen health systems in low- and middle-income countries.

Continue reading

The Global Financing Facility in Uganda through a pandemic lens

The COVID-19 pandemic has redirected the world’s attention to the importance of strong public health systems. Uganda, one of the Global Financing Facility’s (GFF) country cases, was also impacted by the virus outbreak. Our new factsheet – a second joint publication in the series with our partner CEHURD – provides an overview of updated information about the GFF in Uganda (since the first publication) and of its response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Continue reading

More engagement and inclusivity in the GFF strategy – a lobby success

Myria Koutsoumpa

The Global Financing Facility (GFF) – a global health initiative aiming to end preventable deaths and improve the life of women, children, and adolescents in low- and middle-income countries – is evolving. Continuous lobby and advocacy by civil society has influenced its direction, making it more inclusive. In this blog, we will elaborate on how Wemos influenced the new strategy of this major global health initiative in collaboration with our partners and networks.

Continue reading

The Global Financing Facility at five: time for a change?

Where does the Global Financing Facility and its ambitions and objectives stand today, five years after its implementation in multiple countries? In their commentary article in the Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters Journal, Lisa Seidelmann (former Wemos), Myria Koutsoumpa (Wemos), Frederik Federspiel (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, The People’s Fund for Global Health and Development) and Mit Philips (Médecins Sans Frontières) look into the GFF’s operations and governance over the past years, and ask: is it time for a change?

Continue reading

New Oxfam Novib publication: stories of influencing networks

Wemos continues our work on the Global Financing Facility (GFF) through the contribution to a newly published paper by Oxfam Novib, ‘Beating the Drum: Stories of Influencing Networks’. The publication is a collection of stories about influencing networks working in various thematic fields, and focuses on learning about partnerships and how these can be mutually beneficial within the context of a network. Wemos contributed to the collection of stories with our advocacy work on the GFF.

Continue reading

Is it time for a refresh of the Global Financing Facility?

Wemos critically follows the developments and outcomes of the Global Financing Facility (GFF) for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health and Nutrition. It is currently under the process of a ‘strategy refresh’, planned to be launched around September 2020. With our new fact sheet, we looked into the implications of a potential shift from the GFF’s current structure as a Multi-Donor Trust Fund towards a Financial Intermediary Fund.

Continue reading

The rights-based approach to health: Wemos in Devex

This week Devex – a media platform for the global development community – explores the question whether governments should see health care as an ‘investment’. One of the people who comment on this matter, is our global health advocate Mariska Meurs. She talks about health financing and achieving Universal Health Coverage, from a rights-based approach. “Reorienting the health funding discourse around human rights may also be economically beneficial, as it disentangles health financing from politics.”

Continue reading