Tag: WHO

wha wemos 2018

The future of global health, then and now

Linda Mans

Last week, the 71st edition of the World Health Assembly and pre-meetings of civil society discussed topics of this very moment such as health and environment, or the root causes of health inequity. At the same time, the Alma-Ata declaration from forty years ago showed its renewed actuality. That made the Assembly my trip back to the future.

Continue reading

Action plan for sustainable health workforce policy in European region

This week, European health ministers, high-level representatives and civil society organizations have gathered in Budapest for the 67th session of European member states of the World Health Organization (WHO). In a statement that she delivered on behalf of Medicus Mundi International (MMI), Wemos global health advocate Linda Mans stressed that without investments in health workforce, guaranteeing health security and universal access to health will be an impossible task.

Continue reading

blog linda mans wemos global health watch

We cannot allow this plan to fail: invest in health workforce

Linda Mans & Mariëlle Bemelmans

 

With changing lifestyles and ageing population, chronic diseases have become increasingly common. Bearing this in mind, it has been predicted that by the year 2030, there will be a demand for 40 million new jobs in healthcare worldwide, most of these in high-income countries. In this same period, the shortage of health workforce in low-income countries will have grown to 18 million. These numbers are clear and point to the same conclusion: now, more than ever, we need a global strategy to tackle this unequal distribution. Wemos is glad that all member states of the World Health Organization (WHO) have adopted the five-year plan ‘Health Employment and Economic Growth’ at the recent World Health Assembly in Geneva.

Continue reading

A Tanzanian view on the health workforce crisis

Renée de Jong

 

At Wemos we believe in evidence-based advocacy. This also means keeping in touch with people who work on the ground and hearing their stories. During the 70th World Health Assembly in May 2017, Paul Nedermeijer and I had the opportunity to work with the People’s Health Movement (PHM) and the WHO Watch team. Among the group was Godfrey Philimon, a highly motivated Tanzanian public health advocate. I interviewed him about his perspectives on the human resources for health situation in Tanzania.

Continue reading